Paul's Heart

Life As A Dad, And A Survivor

Archive for the category “Adoption”

Merry Christmas To All


 

I do not recall in any kind of detail, the thoughts that went through my mind thirty years ago.  My fiance was insisting in my going to Christmas Eve service that evening in spite of me wanting to have anything to do with God at all.  I felt that my minister had spurned me, because he was too busy (of course he was, it was the Christmas season).  But I was really angry.  I had everything going for me.  I was getting married in five months.  And instead, I was facing something that had the possibility of killing me.

I did attend services that evening, candlelight.  Admittedly, it is one of the more beautiful services to attend.  But as the night wore on, my anger turned to tears, as best as I could to hide them from everyone around me.  No one else had known yet was I was dealing with.  But I found myself finally, perhaps not as tough as I thought I was, scared even.

Over the decades, I have gotten to enjoy so many more Christmas holidays.  And none could be more meaningful than those celebrated with my two daughters.

However, just as I experienced thirty years ago, the holidays are not always so joyous because for one reason or another someone may not be able to be with us, or perhaps is no longer with us.  Soldiers protecting us overseas or stationed somewhere other than close to home.  Distance apart from loved ones.  Tragedies.

I miss so many at this time of year, family and friends.  Perhaps none so more deeply than my daughters and my father.  While I will get to see my children during the holiday, it was Christmas-time that I saw the side of my father that I never got to see as a child, though in the role of “pappy.”  Not caring for the holiday at all because of what happened to my stepmother, he went out of his way, above and beyond to make sure his house was ready for when my daughters came to visit.  Finally at an age where they can understand what had happened, back then, all they saw was a joyful “pappy” and were all to willing to play with all the interactive  decorations that he put on display, knowing he would play with them.

I do miss my dad, especially right now.  I miss being with my children.  And I definitely miss that interaction between the three of them.  And I know I am not alone in having feelings like this, which I know can make this time of year very difficult for so many.

But I truly hope, that somehow, you can find a way, make a pleasant memory of this holiday.

To everyone reading this, I wish you a very Merry Christmas (and happy holidays to those who do not celebrate Christmas but rather celebrate the holiday season in other ways).

Advertisements

If You Would Have Known


If there is one thing that my daughters know about me, they can always count on me.  My daughters know that I will always encourage them.  Both of my daughters know that I believe in them.  They also know that they can come to me when they need help or advice.

I want to be careful here so that I do not upset other parents.  It is a parent’s choice the decisions that they make with their child as far as extracurricular activities and how many they participate in.  My approach was two-pronged.  First, I wanted them to find something that they liked to do.  Second, they commit to it.

If there is one lesson in life that I remember growing up, it was learning the importance of an education, and not just relying on the dreams of being a pro-football player or movie star, or someone else earning popularity or riches.  The odds would be against me, nothing would just fall into my lap.  And if I worked and studied hard, I would find out that my life would be pretty good even if I did not make that superstardom.

My oldest daughter had an interesting, yet I am sure not a unique approach, not wanting to practice, just do it.  From the first dance class, she showed quite a bit of talent.  And when it came to singing in the church choir, she shined.  But as I said, when it came to practice, it is not that she did not feel that she want to practice, she was bored with the level of performance that was expected, as when the participation actually meant something.  It was not unheard of during karate classes, for the instructor to ask me, “where did she learn to do that?”  To which I replied, “I thought you taught her to do that,” referring to a higher level of move than what she should have been able to do.

My younger daughter took practicing differently.  She is a bit of a social butterfly, so she enjoyed the extra time around all of the other children.  And like her older sister, she did well.  She would learn many techniques, and be promoted in belt rankings several times.  But for whatever reason, she had just one issue.  Competition.

The odd thing was, during practices and even belt promotions, all of the same participants were there.  The same parents attended each event and practice, and my daughter knew them all.  But for whatever reason, she would totally break down, when it would come to a competition, where she needed to perform individually.  I never expected to see that from someone who had only shown confidence, and fun.  But it was something that I learned about my daughter.  And it would be a lesson that would make a difference to her later on in life.

Neither of my children are attention hounds, but during school, there will be times that you are called upon in class.  Whether it will be to reach a page from a book, or answer a math problem, a student will have to speak up in front of others.  And on a minor level of participation like this, is one thing.  I would find out during her foreign language course that she takes, that her experiences in karate helped her to overcome.

In order to be graded in a foreign language, you not only have to be able to read it and write it, but you must also speak it.  And unlike reading and writing, speaking must be done individually.  And that would mean that my daughter would be in a similar “arena” as she was during competitions in karate.  Only now, able to overcome the pressure that would torment her.

I am proud of all of the efforts that my daughters put in to what they do.  And now that they are older, they now talk of their future, and their course selections will mirror their needs to achieve those goals.  Neither back down from any challenge, and if they feel they are not challenged enough, the challenge themselves.  And at the end of the day, they know that I am proud of them, believe in them, and love them.

Talking To Children About Cancer


My children were long from even being thought of when I was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.  But once I had to begin dealing with the late developing side effects from the treatments that I received for my cancer, actually forced to deal with these side effects, even though my daughters were quite young, I had a decision to make.

It was over 10 years ago, my daughters, then aged 3 and 5, had no choice.  They were now aware that their Dad, had at one time, faced cancer.  Though their immediate attention was the fact that I just had open heart surgery to repair long term damage from excessive radiation to my heart as part of my cancer treatments.

Later on in elementary school, my daughters would take up causes for “Hodgkin’s Lymphoma” because their dad had it.  It was cute.  Though they really did not have a concept of just how serious my situation was, they knew Hodgkin’s was a cancer, and I had beaten it.  And up until that time, that is all that I had told them.

As a counselor, I have often been asked, “when is the right time to tell a child?”  The truth is, there never is a right time.  No matter what the issues, a child should always be left to be a child.  There will be plenty of time for a child to act and talk like a grown-up.  Unfortunately, not when it comes to cancer, or any other serious diagnosis.  Which is why, it is so important that you remember, they are children, even if faced with the fact that their parent (or other loved one is facing such a horrible disease).  Keep the information on a level that they can understand, and without the somber tone of drama often associated with talking about cancer.

Kids will get it.  They understand a lot more than we give them credit for.  And let’s face it, times are a lot different from decades ago, when a cancer diagnosis was a definite death sentence.  With social media, survivors are available to give hope, where once there was none.

As I mentioned, my daughters are all too aware how I got to this point of survivorship in my life.  They are not aware of all the details of my health issues that I face.  Over the summer, we began the discussion that I did not know how to begin, that I had Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.

Again, keeping it at a level of understanding for young teens, they learned that it lasted a period of time of over a year and a half.  They learned that I went through chemotherapy and radiation.  And now they have learned that it was those treatments that caused the many health issues I face today.

So, in summary so far, they have learned that I have been around a long time having faced a deadly disease.  Hodgkin’s Lymphoma is considered a “rare” cancer, and thus, often hard to diagnose.  How rare?  According to the American Cancer Society, just over 5,000 new cases get diagnosed every year.  Compared to over 320,000 breast cancer diagnosis every year in women (according to breastcancer.org).  And there are over 140,000 cases of colon and rectal cancer diagnosed every year according to the ACS.

Oddly, the survival rate for Hodgkin’s is one of the higher rates, at around 86%.  One would think that a cure rate would be higher for a more prevalent cancer, but in the case of Hodgkin’s, it is not.  The unfortunate thing about the survival rate for Hodgkin’s, is that it has stayed around this number since 1988, when I was diagnosed.  There are still 14% that do not survive.  How is it possible, to be so close to a 100% curable cancer, things have not improved?  Sure, newer treatments have been discovered, and some may be safer to use, but yet, the survival rate has remained the same.

In a year and a half, I will hit my 30 year mark of survivorship.  My daughters are very aware of how far I have come now.  As one of my daughters has put it, “you are a fighter.  You always have been to me.  You don’t give up.  You will always be one of the strongest people I will ever know.”

Post Navigation